Getting Faster – Its not magic, its work…

Speed and accuracy are the great equalizers on the range. They provide a simple, factual reference on your performance. Almost every pistol competition you shoot has an element of time in its scoring. In USPSA (United States Practical Shooting Association) your hit factor is determined by the number of points you score divided by the time it took you to shoot them. In IDPA (International Defensive Pistol Association) you’re scored off of your total time plus time added on for inaccuracy and penalties. The holes in the target are the second, easy to measure, indication of your performance.
It almost always pays to be faster in competition, and to have the skills to be faster in real life is never going to hurt you. The question I am constantly asked by my fellow competitors, other shooters, and clients on the range is how do I get faster? The answer is … Read more »

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Front Sight Focus

Front Sight Focus

For Instructional Purposes Only! This pistol was verified clear and aimed at a camera set on a timer.
For Instructional Purposes Only! This pistol was verified clear and aimed at a camera set on a timer.

This article will answer a reader’s question debating the importance of front sight focus. While addressing this topic, I’ll also cover the mechanics of the human eye and the different types of pistol sights.

“A lot of instructors, including you, stress the absolute importance of sharply focusing on the front sight when shooting a pistol.  You also put a heavy emphasis on the importance of shooting tight groups in your articles and gun reviews.  However, I attended some other courses and read a ton of other articles that downplay both the importance of front sight focus and shooting tight groups.  In these cases, they emphasize gaining only ‘flash front sight’ to achieve ‘combat accuracy’ as the key to effective defensive shooting.  I’m inclined to side with the latter because Read more »

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Bullet Set-Back

MainBullet Set-Back

In his book, “Student of the Gun,” author, firearms instructor, and former Marine Paul G. Markel succinctly describes the journey through firearms proficiency from novice through “expert.”  More importantly, he describes the attainment of “expert” not as indicative of the end of the journey, but a firm commitment to being a life-long student.  Through my personal journey, I’ve had the opportunity to train, compete, and instruct in firearms disciplines… and there are still many things I learn every day.  Although I’ve studied and written extensively on ballistics and considerations for personal and home defense ammunition, I recently “re-learned” a valuable lesson on bullet set-back that I’d like to briefly share with you.

For a number of years, I’d kept a 1911 in .45ACP as my home defense firearm and loaded it with 185 grain jacketed hollow-point cartridges.  During this time, I’d followed the advice that I’ve … Read more »

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Cold Weather, Gun Lubricants and Your Firearms…

Gun lubricants, Cold weather lubrication, Aegis Academy ,Gun trainingAs the North East is experiencing record breaking lows I thought it a good idea to remind people that temperature has two primary impacts on weapons. We will give a cursory glance at ballistics, which is a complex subject and is or will be explained in detail in Howard’s Ballistics Series. Mechanical functionality is the larger concern for most defensive engagements.

If the temperature drops below 20 degrees, you can safely assume that most every day gun lubricant will be affected. You have a couple of choices. One is buy cold weather gun lubricant.

FP – 10, what we generally recommend for every day use is functional down to about -50.  Artic Brake fluids are another option, which may well make it to -75. Eventually everything freezes… CLP Break Free, a decent inexpensive preservative, and moderate gun lubricant work fines down to about 25 degrees at which point is … Read more »

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